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Coldstream Guards’ Sherman Firefly IC Guards Bridge at Namur

Image Information
Coldstream Guards’ Sherman Firefly IC Guards Bridge at Namur
Image Filename wwii0060.jpg.jpg
Image Size 2.74 MB
Image Dimensions 3000 x 2090
Photographer Unknown
Photographer Title
Caption Author Jason McDonald
Date Photographed 12/25/1944
Location Meuse River
City Namur
State or Province Wallonia
Country Belgium
Archive United States Army
Record Number
Status Caption ©2007, ©2024 MFA Productions LLC Image in the Public Domain


Lieutenant Robert Boscawen (March 17, 1923- ) left with radiophones, commander of 2 Troop, First Battalion, Coldstream Guards, Guards Armoured Division, XXX Corps, in a Sherman Firefly IC Hybrid. Note camouflage cloth on the hull, extra road wheels, and tracks on front hull and turret. The number “52“ refers to the weight of the Firefly in tons. This tank, actually commanded by Sergeant Bastone (kneeling on right), and the rest of First Battalion cut off the German advance through the Ardennes to the Meuse. The IC Hybrid was an American-built late production M4 Sherman with a cast composite hull that mounted a specially designed 17-pounder 77mm (3 inch) anti-tank gun. Sherman Fireflies were the only Allied tank capable of penetrating the German Tiger and Panther panzers. As the situation on the Ardennes front grew critical on December 17-18, 1944, the 21st Army Group realized that the German offensive either targeted the port of Antwerp or Paris itself. Several divisions, including the Guards Armoured, were to reinforce XXX Corps. While scratch units of supply troops and light infantry were immediately rushed in from France, Holland and United Kingdom on December 17 to secure the bridges and the vast supply dumps along the Meuse, heavy mechanized formations arrived on December 19. The First Battalion of the Coldstream Guards took up positions in Namur, one of the few remaining bridges. The masonry bridge had been blown by the retreating Germans in August 1944 and repaired by an American engineering unit with a Bailey Bridge. Boscawen survived hits on four tanks that were burned out or “brewed“ during the war. The fourth loss, in April 1945, caused severe burns to him and his driver; the rest of the crew died. After recovery, Boscawen served in Parliament until 1992.

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